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Re: Dy/Dan's Latest

Richard Strausz
I was unable to go to the NCTM Annual Conference in Boston this month. The link gives me reason #78.4 why I appreciate Dan Meyer. He collected *every* handout from any speaker who posted them online. Quite an amazing collection!

http://blog.mrmeyer.com/2015/every-handout-from-nctm/

Richard
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Re: Dy/Dan's Latest

Carleton Washburne
Well, yes, Richard, but he only does this because he's avoiding mathematics. If he were an honest math teacher teaching Honest Math, he'd spend his time checking to ensure that others were honestly teaching honest math, honestly! I'd say "Honest Injun!" but wouldn't want anyone to think I'm trying to inject multiculturalism into this forum!!!!

Honest.

Richard Strausz wrote:

> I was unable to go to the NCTM Annual Conference in
> Boston this month. The link gives me reason #78.4 why
> I appreciate Dan Meyer. He collected *every* handout
> from any speaker who posted them online. Quite an
> amazing collection!
>
> http://blog.mrmeyer.com/2015/every-handout-from-nctm/
>
> Richard
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Re: Dy/Dan's Latest

Richard Strausz
In reply to this post by Richard Strausz
> Well, yes, Richard, but he only does this because
> he's avoiding mathematics. If he were an honest math
> teacher teaching Honest Math, he'd spend his time
> checking to ensure that others were honestly teaching
> honest math, honestly! I'd say "Honest Injun!" but
> wouldn't want anyone to think I'm trying to inject
> multiculturalism into this forum!!!!
>
> Honest.

Interesting you'd say that, CW. He cleverly indicates with a small MA (for Math Avoidance, I believe) next to the name of every session where it applies.

Richard

>
> Richard Strausz wrote:
>
> > I was unable to go to the NCTM Annual Conference in
> > Boston this month. The link gives me reason #78.4
> why
> > I appreciate Dan Meyer. He collected *every*
> handout
> > from any speaker who posted them online. Quite an
> > amazing collection!
> >
> >
> http://blog.mrmeyer.com/2015/every-handout-from-nctm/
> >
> > Richard
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Re: Dy/Dan's Latest

Bishop, Wayne
In reply to this post by Richard Strausz
It's on my cap, "NCTM Shift Happens".  Amazingly,
when I first joined, the NCTM was about teaching
mathematics – it was led by people with genuine
mathematics competence with a special interest in
its communication as opposed to its avoidance and
people such as dy/Dan.  The cracks were already
there at the elementary level – it was already
chafing over the name of its 2nd-most important
journal, "The Arithmetic Teacher," already
denying that teaching arithmetic is BY FAR the
most important responsibility of elementary
school mathematics education.  "Mathematics" is
so much broader than just arithmetic, you
know.  True, of course, but the inability to
teach arithmetic effectively leaves little hope
for competence with deeper stuff.

By revelation of the holy writ in 1989, the NCTM
non-Standards, secondary had been lost as
well.  I can't remember his name but one of its
past presidents (with a PhD in math, not math ed)
spent the rest of his long life trying to
undermine them but, of course, to no avail.  Math
avoidance was too ingrained throughout the
organization.  Once again, give credit where
credit is due, our colleges of education and
"professional" math ed in particular.

Wayne

At 04:05 PM 4/27/2015, Richard Strausz wrote:
>I was unable to go to the NCTM Annual Conference
>in Boston this month. The link gives me reason
>#78.4 why I appreciate Dan Meyer. He collected
>*every* handout from any speaker who posted them
>online. Quite an amazing collection!
>
>http://blog.mrmeyer.com/2015/every-handout-from-nctm/
>
>Richard
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Re: Dy/Dan's Latest

Robert Hansen
The NCTM is an organization of math teachers for math teachers. Some choose to be a math teacher to teach math, to pass down the art, and some choose to be a math teacher to be a math teacher. The latter group looks for ways to make being a math teacher more enjoyable, for math teachers.

Bob Hansen

> On Apr 28, 2015, at 10:16 AM, Wayne Bishop <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> It's on my cap, "NCTM Shift Happens".  Amazingly, when I first joined, the NCTM was about teaching mathematics - it was led by people with genuine mathematics competence with a special interest in its communication as opposed to its avoidance and people such as dy/Dan.  The cracks were already there at the elementary level - it was already chafing over the name of its 2nd-most important journal, "The Arithmetic Teacher," already denying that teaching arithmetic is BY FAR the most important responsibility of elementary school mathematics education.  "Mathematics" is so much broader than just arithmetic, you know.  True, of course, but the inability to teach arithmetic effectively leaves little hope for competence with deeper stuff.
>
> By revelation of the holy writ in 1989, the NCTM non-Standards, secondary had been lost as well.  I can't remember his name but one of its past presidents (with a PhD in math, not math ed) spent the rest of his long life trying to undermine them but, of course, to no avail.  Math avoidance was too ingrained throughout the organization.  Once again, give credit where credit is due, our colleges of education and "professional" math ed in particular.
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Re: Dy/Dan's Latest

Bishop, Wayne
I don't know if it's a nationwide phenomenon or not but it is
definitely the case here at Cal State LA (with a huge teacher prep
focus).  WAY too many prospective math teachers want to be teachers
but have no special ability or interest in mathematics.  They are in
it because there is a perception of a job at the end.  That's an
important consideration, of course, but it does not bode well for
their effectiveness in their chosen "profession".  3 decades ago, I
saw essentially no students in that category; now I see lots.

Wayne

At 07:22 AM 4/28/2015, Robert Hansen wrote:

>The NCTM is an organization of math teachers for math teachers. Some
>choose to be a math teacher to teach math, to pass down the art, and
>some choose to be a math teacher to be a math teacher. The latter
>group looks for ways to make being a math teacher more enjoyable,
>for math teachers.
>
>Bob Hansen
>
> > On Apr 28, 2015, at 10:16 AM, Wayne Bishop
> <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >
> > It's on my cap, "NCTM Shift Happens".  Amazingly, when I first
> joined, the NCTM was about teaching mathematics - it was led by
> people with genuine mathematics competence with a special interest
> in its communication as opposed to its avoidance and people such as
> dy/Dan.  The cracks were already there at the elementary level - it
> was already chafing over the name of its 2nd-most important
> journal, "The Arithmetic Teacher," already denying that teaching
> arithmetic is BY FAR the most important responsibility of
> elementary school mathematics education.  "Mathematics" is so much
> broader than just arithmetic, you know.  True, of course, but the
> inability to teach arithmetic effectively leaves little hope for
> competence with deeper stuff.
> >
> > By revelation of the holy writ in 1989, the NCTM non-Standards,
> secondary had been lost as well.  I can't remember his name but one
> of its past presidents (with a PhD in math, not math ed) spent the
> rest of his long life trying to undermine them but, of course, to
> no avail.  Math avoidance was too ingrained throughout the
> organization.  Once again, give credit where credit is due, our
> colleges of education and "professional" math ed in particular.
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Re: Dy/Dan's Latest

kirby urner-4
In reply to this post by Bishop, Wayne


On Tue, Apr 28, 2015 at 9:11 AM, Wayne Bishop <[hidden email]> wrote:
It's on my cap, "NCTM Shift Happens".  Amazingly, when I first joined, the NCTM was about teaching mathematics – it was led by people with genuine mathematics competence with a special interest in its communication as opposed to its avoidance and people such as dy/Dan. 

Sounds like romantic nostalgia maybe?  They didn't know much math back then.  No base 2.  Worthless.  Approximately all arithmetic is done in base 2 these days, if we count all the operations done with numbers around the world.  People who learned arithmetic in the 1950s or before are too ignorant to be allowed to have a job?  Not true!  They've been learning ever since.  Education, even in arithmetic, does not stop with elementary school.
 
The cracks were already there at the elementary level – it was already chafing over the name of its 2nd-most important journal, "The Arithmetic Teacher," already denying that teaching arithmetic is BY FAR the most important responsibility of elementary school mathematics education. 

Depends what you mean by "arithmetic".  If it's all in base 10 it's a complete waste of time and all such curricula need to be junked immediately.

One *must* know about bases to be a functioning human being in today's world.  So as long as we don't use a narrow definition of arithmetic we'll be OK.
 
"Mathematics" is so much broader than just arithmetic, you know.  True, of course, but the inability to teach arithmetic effectively leaves little hope for competence with deeper stuff.

Again, arithmetic is not a self-defining term.  No term is.
 

By revelation of the holy writ in 1989, the NCTM non-Standards, secondary had been lost as well.  I can't remember his name but one of its past presidents (with a PhD in math, not math ed) spent the rest of his long life trying to undermine them but, of course, to no avail.  Math avoidance was too ingrained throughout the organization.  Once again, give credit where credit is due, our colleges of education and "professional" math ed in particular.

Wayne


I'm not convinced that PhDs in math have been paying sufficient attention to CS.   CS is the new mathematics.  Any curriculum advisory board with only PhD mathematicians is likely to be a dinosaur body.  Lets avoid those at all costs.

Kirby



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Re: Dy/Dan's Latest

Carleton Washburne
In reply to this post by Richard Strausz
Written like someone who has never belonged to NCTM or any other organization of professional mathematics teachers, researchers, educators, or the like. Who hasn't the foggiest idea what such organizations are about, of their lengthy histories, of their range of ideas, practices, philosophies, etc. And who is himself not a mathematics teacher, researcher, educator or anything of the kind.

As a result, we see a person who simply makes things up to suit his ntil own historical disdain for a few teachers whom he feels wronged him as a youngster. Not much foundation for analyzing what actually goes on in K-12 mathematics classrooms, but an excellent basis for seven or so years of ranting about any mathematics teacher who doesn't fit his own narrow notions of "honest" math teaching and accusing his betters of a host of imaginary crimes and misdemeanors.

Are there bad mathematics teachers out there? Of course there are. But as to what percentage are bad we will never know from reading the comments of Robert Hansen.

Until we are looking at meaningful definitions of what it means to be a "bad mathematics teachers," and real data on those currently teaching, all we are going to find from the anti-teacher side of the aisle is hot air and bile.

In the tiny echo chamber of math-teach, the naysayers will trip over one another in the rush to clap one another on the back as each posts another anti-teacher, anti-public education screed, and even those who know better will applaud Robert's inventions and flights of fancy since they fit the - dare I say it? - prime directive: never write anything about American society that questions a fundamentally racist and classist system increasingly rigged to serve a shrinking percentage of its people. Blame everything but those really running things, particularly convenient scapegoats like unions, progressive educators, or, when all else fails, Al Sharpton. No doubt this keeps the naysayers happy, but it has little, if anything, to do with reality.

Robert Hansen wrote:

> The NCTM is an organization of math teachers for math
> teachers. Some choose to be a math teacher to teach
> math, to pass down the art, and some choose to be a
> math teacher to be a math teacher. The latter group
> looks for ways to make being a math teacher more
> enjoyable, for math teachers.
>
> Bob Hansen
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Re: Dy/Dan's Latest

Richard Strausz
In reply to this post by Richard Strausz
CW, I chuckled as I read the comments of Wayne and Robert about the NCTM in response to the collection of handouts by presenters at the NCTM conference.

It's like criticizing Op Ed pieces in a newspaper by saying 'I never liked that newspaper.'

Oh well!

Richard
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Re: Dy/Dan's Latest

Carleton Washburne
In reply to this post by Richard Strausz
Richard, I was thinking of the old saw about looking gift horses in their mouths, but perhaps this also applies:

http://mathwithbaddrawings.com/2015/04/29/a-math-teachers-guide-to-explaining-technology-to-your-parents/

> CW, I chuckled as I read the comments of Wayne and
> Robert about the NCTM in response to the collection
> of handouts by presenters at the NCTM conference.
>
> It's like criticizing Op Ed pieces in a newspaper by
> saying 'I never liked that newspaper.'
>
> Oh well!
>
> Richard
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Re: Dy/Dan's Latest

Joe Niederberger
In reply to this post by Richard Strausz
CW says:
>Richard, I was thinking of the old saw about looking gift horses in their mouths, but perhaps this also applies:
http://mathwithbaddrawings.com/2015/04/29/a-math-teachers-guide-to-explaining-technology-to-your-parents/

So called digital natives think they are techy because they are good consumers. How American. I give up, Don Draper has won after all.

Cheers,
Joe N
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Re: Dy/Dan's Latest

Robert Hansen
On 4/29/15, 11:37 AM, "Joe Niederberger" <[hidden email]> wrote:

So called digital natives think they are techy because they are good consumers. How American. I give up, Don Draper has won after all.

Well, I was a member of NCTM. You don’t have to be a professional teacher to join NCTM. I have probably read and studied more NCTM material than Richard. And I joined MAA as well, partly to have access to JSTOR without having to drive over to the college campuses every time I wanted to track down a reference to an article. Sometimes you get lucky with google, but most of the original quality is still (unfortunately) locked up in journals.

Bob Hansen
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Re: Dy/Dan's Latest

Dave L. Renfro
In reply to this post by Richard Strausz
Richard Strausz wrote:

http://mathforum.org/kb/message.jspa?messageID=9757681

> I was unable to go to the NCTM Annual Conference in Boston this month.
> The link gives me reason #78.4 why I appreciate Dan Meyer. He collected
> *every* handout from any speaker who posted them online.
> Quite an amazing collection!
>
> http://blog.mrmeyer.com/2015/every-handout-from-nctm/

I think this is a great idea and I'm surprised no one (that I know of)
has done this before. MAA Section meetings should have something like
this, and I may suggest it to those in charge of the section I belong to.

I quickly looked through the titles for something of possible interest
to me (didn't see anything) and at some of the names to see if I recognized
any (I didn't), but I'll probably come back when I have more time.

If I were still teaching (especially high school teaching), I'd probably
find a few things that would be useful for student projects (or that
would suggest something that I could modify to be useful for student
projects), and I'd certainly refer Meyer's list to students looking for
ideas of things to present at a state math convention meeting.

As for what I think of dy/dan's blog regarding math or lack of math
(often discussed in math-teach), I dug up an old post of mine that
discusses this and which I don't feel differently about now. My main
concern, and it's really a matter of my likely not finding it of
much use or interest to me if I was still teaching and not that I'm
all that bothered by what he does do, is summarized in the following
statement I make below: "One of the faults I see with many "applications"
and "side detours" made by teachers and textbooks is that there seems
to be little attention paid in trying to pick those detours that
reinforce things you want to reinforce." For example, given that students
often have trouble with fraction manipulations, I might want to find
an activity or cute story that helps reinforce fraction manipulations
or generates interest in the students to look at this topic, such as
Pat Ballew's 30 December 2008 blog entry "Division of Fractions by the
Alien Method" (URL below).

- ----------------------------------------------------------------
- ----------------------------------------------------------------

math-teach post (21 June 2010)
http://mathforum.org/kb/message.jspa?messageID=7104589

In the case of dy/dan, I wonder if the lack of math is because
he devotes most of his efforts to his classes and only posts
initial "attention getters" on his blog? Anyway, I haven't looked
at his blog much (mainly because when I have I haven't seen much
of interest to me), but it seems to me that a better blog for
the purposes that dy/dan's blog is praised for is Pat Ballew's blog.
The motivation and pictures are there, and then he launches into
the math. Here's a purely random selection from his archive:

http://pballew.blogspot.com/2008_12_01_archive.html

As for dy/dan's blog about annuli, one topic I've seen a few
teaching/expository papers on (I can post specific references
if anyone is interested) has to do with playing/recording
speed (density?) on record groves. As a record is played,
the angular velocity remains constant (33 and 1/3 rev/min,
for example), but the grove-radii get smaller, so the the
needle travels more slowly along the grove. Thus, in order
to have the sound play uniformly, one would like to have
a formula giving the speed the needle travels along the
grove as a function of time and, while solvable, this is
not something that's totally trivial.

Below is another school-appropriate topic related to annuli,
which I posted here about a year ago. Note how the difference
of squares factorization makes an appearance, as well as the
standard trick of multiplying and dividing by the same number.
One of the faults I see with many "applications" and "side
detours" made by teachers and textbooks is that there seems
to be little attention paid in trying to pick those detours
that reinforce things you want to reinforce. It's not enough for
something to look pretty. You can look out the window at trees
for that (tree trunks are cylinders, leaves are ... well, like
the leaves in an n-leaf rose I suppose [1], etc.). What you
want is something that is (and can be shown to be) mathematically
relevant to the topics the students are (or have been, and maybe
sometimes "or will be") studying.

[1] http://www.google.com/images?as_epq=n+leaf+rose

- ----------------------------------------------------------------
- ----------------------------------------------------------------

Dave L. Renfro
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Re: Dy/Dan's Latest

Bishop, Wayne
In reply to this post by Richard Strausz
Chuckle to your hearts content and continue to
post these inspired demonstrations of math
avoidance.  Your Naperville example was classic;
after the initial flush, checking the details
showed that it had absolutely NOTHING to do ANY
of the unusually strong high school's actual math
classes.  The entire focus was on what to do with
kids in high school who a!re not prepared to do
high school work.  Instead of making up essential
mathematics deficits to proceed with honest high
school, have fun and games of the athletic field.

Regarding how far the NCTM has diverged from
actually teaching mathematics (what a concept!),
nothing summarizes it better than its current
president, Diane Briars.  I know her "research"
only too well from when she was the head of a
particularly well-funded (NSF-EHR) math program
across the Pittsburgh Public Schools.  I was
commissioned by its Board of Ed to participate in
a study of the district's program and actual
student performance was nothing close to the way
it was presented with lots of national
fanfare.  How to do that?  Never mention
Pennsylvania's state exams, the PSSA.  In spite
of being "proven" that Everyday Math, and its
discovery based pedagogy, was the long-awaited
mathematics education salvation for low
socioeconomic, high minority populations, reality
was that by the 5th grade, at least 60% of those
kids were already in the bottom two categories,
Below Proficient or Far Below Proficient.

Regarding your analogy with Op-Ed pieces in
newspapers… If you do not believe that they
reflect the editorial philosophy of the
newspaper; you need some elementary lessons in
that area as well.  Publishing some token
opposition is often done to feign objectivity but that's about all.

Wayne

At 03:05 AM 4/29/2015, Richard Strausz wrote:

>CW, I chuckled as I read the comments of Wayne
>and Robert about the NCTM in response to the
>collection of handouts by presenters at the NCTM conference.
>
>It's like criticizing Op Ed pieces in a
>newspaper by saying 'I never liked that newspaper.'
>
>Oh well!
>
>Richard
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Re: Dy/Dan's Latest

Carleton Washburne
In reply to this post by Richard Strausz
Robert Hansen wrote:

> On 4/29/15, 11:37 AM, "Joe Niederberger"
> <[hidden email]<mailto:niederberger@comcast.
> net>> wrote:
>
> So called digital natives think they are techy
> because they are good consumers. How American. I give
> up, Don Draper has won after all.
>
> Well, I was a member of NCTM. You don’t have to be a
> professional teacher to join NCTM. I have probably
> read and studied more NCTM material than Richard. And
> I joined MAA as well, partly to have access to JSTOR
> without having to drive over to the college campuses
> every time I wanted to track down a reference to an
> article. Sometimes you get lucky with google, but
> most of the original quality is still (unfortunately)
> locked up in journals.
>
> Bob Hansen

Once again, Robert, you leave me breathlessly awaiting the smallest shred of evidence to support quantifiable claims like "I have probably read and studied more NCTM material than Richard."

Really? Richard spent his entire career, perhaps 40 years give or take a few, as a secondary mathematics teacher. Any chance he actually has read considerably more NCTM publications than you have?

More importantly, unlike you, Richard actually appears to have mastered both reading and writing English. So how many NCTM publication have you "read" and utterly misunderstood, misinterpreted, misconstrued, and generally destroyed in the process of translating them from something meaningful to you typical reductionism into "Gee, these are dumb folks who just aren't in my league when it comes to math, teaching math, and the rest of my fantasy life"?

Having your eyes move over text isn't quite the same as digesting the content therein. Your posts are daily proof of that sad reality.
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Re: Dy/Dan's Latest

Carleton Washburne
In reply to this post by Richard Strausz
I've heard of "value added." Your post appears to be a case of "nonsense added." You seem to specialize in self-amused little bon mots that I speculate must pass in your own mind as rapier-like skewerings of whatever you disagree with. Somehow, translating my comment and/or the blog post I cited as paeans to consumerism seems not only well off-point but fundamentally wrong-headed. Technology is out there. We choose to use it or do not. You, no doubt, are well off the modern grid yourself, connecting to the Internet to share your witticisms with us via a Dixie cup and a thread. You likely have no television, let alone any sort of educational technology. No wonder you feel compelled to try to dismiss so many of Kirby's posts: his unwillingness to simply reject human ingenuity and cling fiercely onto the 11th century or so must be so frustrating, particulalry since he manages to ground it in egalitarian notions like open source, the work of Bucky Fuller, and much else that it's!
 hard to make a real argument that he's some sort of ignorant victim or worshiper of consumerism. Yet you seem dedicated, via your cup & thread from an unheated cabin in the hills (of Montana? New Jersey?) to just that hopeless, fruitless task. The Don Draper remark below is similarly ineffectual. And frankly, it's not even funny.

Joe N. wrote:

> CW says:
> >Richard, I was thinking of the old saw about looking
> gift horses in their mouths, but perhaps this also
> applies:
> http://mathwithbaddrawings.com/2015/04/29/a-math-teach
> ers-guide-to-explaining-technology-to-your-parents/
>
> So called digital natives think they are techy
> because they are good consumers. How American. I give
> up, Don Draper has won after all.
>
> Cheers,
> Joe N
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Re: Dy/Dan's Latest

Carleton Washburne
In reply to this post by Richard Strausz
This from the fellow who has made clear more than once that he need not actually read something to know it's worse than worthless. :) Apparently those with proper psychic gifts CAN judge books and research journals, etc., by their covers (knowing the author usually suffices for you). It must get a little dicey when people grow and change, as did, for one noteworthy example, Diane Ravitch. Or when an old ally like the Fordham folks confusingly come out in FAVOR of the Common Core State Standards! What to do? Well, you always manage to juggle the contradictions.

And when all else fails, attack people not here to reply, as in the latest case of Diane Briars. Don't forget to blow your own horn while you're at it. And though you failed to do so in this particular smear, you can always tell us about one or another of your genius offspring.

Snore.


Wayne Bishop wrote:

> Chuckle to your hearts content and continue to
> post these inspired demonstrations of math
> avoidance.  Your Naperville example was classic;
> after the initial flush, checking the details
> showed that it had absolutely NOTHING to do ANY
> of the unusually strong high school's actual math
> classes.  The entire focus was on what to do with
> kids in high school who a!re not prepared to do
> high school work.  Instead of making up essential
> mathematics deficits to proceed with honest high
> school, have fun and games of the athletic field.
>
> Regarding how far the NCTM has diverged from
> actually teaching mathematics (what a concept!),
> nothing summarizes it better than its current
> president, Diane Briars.  I know her "research"
> only too well from when she was the head of a
> particularly well-funded (NSF-EHR) math program
> across the Pittsburgh Public Schools.  I was
> commissioned by its Board of Ed to participate in
> a study of the district's program and actual
> student performance was nothing close to the way
> it was presented with lots of national
> fanfare.  How to do that?  Never mention
> Pennsylvania's state exams, the PSSA.  In spite
> of being "proven" that Everyday Math, and its
> discovery based pedagogy, was the long-awaited
> mathematics education salvation for low
> socioeconomic, high minority populations, reality
> was that by the 5th grade, at least 60% of those
> kids were already in the bottom two categories,
> Below Proficient or Far Below Proficient.
>
> Regarding your analogy with Op-Ed pieces in
> newspapers… If you do not believe that they
> reflect the editorial philosophy of the
> newspaper; you need some elementary lessons in
> that area as well.  Publishing some token
> opposition is often done to feign objectivity but
> that's about all.
>
> Wayne
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Re: Dy/Dan's Latest

Robert Hansen
In reply to this post by Dave L. Renfro
On 4/29/15, 12:00 PM, "Dave L. Renfro" <[hidden email]> wrote:

In the case of dy/dan, I wonder if the lack of math is because
he devotes most of his efforts to his classes and only posts
initial "attention getters" on his blog?

But this is not Dan. He has, both directly and indirectly, on many occasions and in many ways, stated his and his student’s dislike for math. As far as he is concerned, if and when he does anything at all with what we call math, what he calls procedure, it is because he is forced to. Even when he was teaching, several years ago, when I first came upon him, his philosophy was the same. Counter math.

This is from 2010, when he was teaching.

http://www.ted.com/talks/dan_meyer_math_curriculum_makeover?language=en

Teacher angst, not math.

I also went further an checked the results of these classrooms, his and those of others on his blog. If your hypothesis was true, we would see the evidence of math in the classrooms and in the exams.

Just another crank that most of our children would never encounter because we are not disadvantaged.

Bob Hansen
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Re: Dy/Dan's Latest

Richard Strausz
In reply to this post by Richard Strausz
> Chuckle to your hearts content and continue to
> post these inspired demonstrations of math
> avoidance.  Your Naperville example was classic;
> after the initial flush, checking the details
> showed that it had absolutely NOTHING to do ANY
> of the unusually strong high school's actual math
> classes.  The entire focus was on what to do with
> kids in high school who a!re not prepared to do
> high school work.  Instead of making up essential
> mathematics deficits to proceed with honest high
> school, have fun and games of the athletic field.
>
Wayne, a difference between you and a typical K-12 teacher you put down is that she has to gather comparative data on how her students are doing compared to others local and beyond. You, on the other hand, make excuses to duck comparisons *and* give your students the midterm as their final.

Richard

> Regarding how far the NCTM has diverged from
> actually teaching mathematics (what a concept!),
> nothing summarizes it better than its current
> president, Diane Briars.  I know her "research"
> only too well from when she was the head of a
> particularly well-funded (NSF-EHR) math program
> across the Pittsburgh Public Schools.  I was
> commissioned by its Board of Ed to participate in
> a study of the district's program and actual
> student performance was nothing close to the way
> it was presented with lots of national
> fanfare.  How to do that?  Never mention
> Pennsylvania's state exams, the PSSA.  In spite
> of being "proven" that Everyday Math, and its
> discovery based pedagogy, was the long-awaited
> mathematics education salvation for low
> socioeconomic, high minority populations, reality
> was that by the 5th grade, at least 60% of those
> kids were already in the bottom two categories,
> Below Proficient or Far Below Proficient.
>
> Regarding your analogy with Op-Ed pieces in
> newspapers… If you do not believe that they
> reflect the editorial philosophy of the
> newspaper; you need some elementary lessons in
> that area as well.  Publishing some token
> opposition is often done to feign objectivity but
> that's about all.
>

... Except of course when they don't reflect the same philosophy...

Richard

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Re: Dy/Dan's Latest

Bishop, Wayne
In reply to this post by Robert Hansen
Beautiful, Bob, and entirely consistent with his popularity among the math avoidance legions; it's always good to have a Messiah.  By contrast with his perception of reality, cookbook word problems were what convinced me that I had some potential in mathematics.  I understood arithmetic, of course, and if I slowed down enough to pay attention to do it correctly, even got the right answer but I hated doing so.  Word problems – exactly the stuff that he disses so persuasively – were an entirely different story.  His focus is babysitting students who have no business being in classes called "mathematics".  Unfortunately, babysitting is the highest priority of precollegiate public education.

Haim keeps telling us that even trying to teach mathematics to turnips is a fool's errand and he is right but, fool that I am, I keep trying.  Leaving the name mathematics while selling math avoidance snake-oil is so much more productive and amply financed in spite of its constant appeals for more.

Wayne

At 09:38 AM 4/29/2015, Robert Hansen wrote:
On 4/29/15, 12:00 PM, "Dave L. Renfro" <[hidden email]> wrote:

In the case of dy/dan, I wonder if the lack of math is because
he devotes most of his efforts to his classes and only posts
initial "attention getters" on his blog?


But this is not Dan. He has, both directly and indirectly, on many occasions and in many ways, stated his and his student’s dislike for math. As far as he is concerned, if and when he does anything at all with what we call math, what he calls procedure, it is because he is forced to. Even when he was teaching, several years ago, when I first came upon him, his philosophy was the same. Counter math.

This is from 2010, when he was teaching.

http://www.ted.com/talks/dan_meyer_math_curriculum_makeover?language=en

Teacher angst, not math.

I also went further an checked the results of these classrooms, his and those of others on his blog. If your hypothesis was true, we would see the evidence of math in the classrooms and in the exams.

Just another crank that most of our children would never encounter because we are not disadvantaged.

Bob Hansen
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